During the past 50 years we all have been scared by the slogan “Fat makes you fat”. Conventional medicine and nutrition advice told us to eat a low fat, low cholesterol diet. Food manufacturers jumped on the band wagon, producing plenty of “low fat” products. The result? A rise in chronic diseases, obesity, diabetes, heart disease and other chronic illnesses.

Now slowly mainstream medicine realizes that this was wrong. The rise in chronic diseases like obesity and diabetes is likely a consequence of the increased consumption of highly processed, high sugar foods. The recommendation to eat no or few eggs has been removed.

What is the truth in my opinion?  It depends.

Generally speaking, the more processed and refined your food, the worse it is for your health. The human body was never meant to stuff itself with load of these “edible matter”, as I call it, which not only contains all kinds of sugars and refined carbohydrates, but also “modified” fats (the substitute for the “bad” trans fats). No one knows what really are modified fats and what they may do for your health!

There is an old rule that I try to live by:

“If it grows in the soil, eat it; if it was produced in a factory, avoid it”.

How does that apply to fats?  We still hear that so-called vegetable oils, like corn, safflower, canola oils, are good for you because they contain unsaturated fatty acids. Most of these oils are highly processed and may contain many pesticide residues. What about olive oil? You might have heard that most olive oil sold in stores is fake and blended with other oils.
Time to throw up your hands in the air and give up? No! Follow these simple guide lines:

The closer to the natural food a fat you use is, the better. My favorites: Eggs from happy chickens that are allowed to roam outside on grassy fields all day (pastured eggs), real extra virgin olive oil (you can distinguish it by the color (greenish) and taste (a little spicy)), cold-pressed from the first pressing, fatty small fish like sardines, herring and mackerel, Avocados and their oil, virgin organic coconut oil, cold-pressed, butter from happy, grass-fed cows, fat from happy animals treated humanely and fed a natural diet (cows eat grass, pigs roam in the fields and woods, you get the idea), nuts and seeds. To reduce your exposure to pesticides, herbicides and other chemicals, buy organic and local, whenever possible. Store fats and oils in the fridge or freezer, whenever possible and keep out of the light.

“But what do I do if I don’t have the money to buy all that?” You may ask. Yes, it seems expensive at first. But you don’t eat much of these fats as they are more satisfying as “standard fats”.

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